Reverse Hypers using rubber-bands

Reverse hypers is a movement that provides versatility and relevance when the goal is to enhance Hip function within rehab and performance training scenarios. The "Walking pattern against gravity" and the "Both hips reverse hypers" are two staple-versions tailored at QTX using Glute-Ham-Developer apparatus (GHD). The rubber-bands are prescribed only when the client's motion pattern achieves optimal standards and ready to increase external resistance so as to adapt to new strength levels. Both options encourage recruitment of gluteus and Spine erectors and serve as variations to the "Reverse Hypers Rolls" machine made popular by Louie Simmons, where slight spine flexion is encouraged.

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Hip Ab & Hip Ad

It's not just the fact that the adductors machine doesn't represent a carryover or functional movement for human beings.  The main concern -in terms of biomechanics, physiological and neuromuscular functions- is the fact that the inner thigh muscles are designed to activate more efficiently during tension (think about a rubber band getting stretched). Such tension  represents the eccentric contraction of the movement (or negative phase of the movement (for instance, putting a heavy pot on the floor). Through corrective training, the adductor muscles can get adapted to greater levels of tension. The adductor machine, on the other hand, does almost the opposite as it provides resistance mostly during de concentric phase of the movement required by the apparatus (which it's the moment when we pick up the heavy pot and our elastic rubbers -the adductor start to lose tension). That doesn't make any sense apart from "decorate" the gym floor with the bulky and shiny machines. Let alone that those pieces of furniture are bolted to the floor and provide the balance, symmetry and stability that your body and brain should find. In shorts words, training results should be earned. Not given by machines.

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Pain Free, Happy Knee!

Check out two different client-cases where feet placement can affect biomechanical, physiological and neuromuscular functions. In layman terms, an inadequate set up can be detrimental for either performance goals or daily activities. We also include a chart recommending appropriate foot gear. See LIVE more cases and training solutions in our upcoming workshop, "Pain Free, Happy Knee". For more information or reserve your place, send us a message at www.QTX.com.au/contact-us. Your questions and constructive feedback are very welcome. 

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Thoughts about the F-word

What's the difference between functional movements, performance training and training performance? What's functional and what is not? Is only Biomechanics what matters? How to identify Neuromuscular and physiological functions? Are they  overrated? In a time when it should be clear that nobody owns the absolute truth there are magazine writers that still dare to qualify their field of expertise as the oasis of physical health and conditioning, while disqualifying other disciplines of knowledge which, instead of being relegated, should be integrated so as to obtain more comprehensive training prescriptions rather than isolated or palliative solutions. Lets not forget we have a duty of care with clients, athletes and referred clients to make sure our program designs are relevant to their lifestyle, athletic goals and therapeutic needs. 

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